Education

FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake believes that education is the key to raising public awareness and appreciation of the Lake. We attend over a dozen community events each year to distribute information about Great Salt Lake.

Summer Camps

We partner with the Natural History Museum of Utah and University of Utah Youth Education to offer two exciting and adventurous summer camps based on the science and ecology of Great Salt Lake!   Great Salt Lake Discoveries for Girls Only (June 10 - 14, 2019) Ladies, the Great Salt…

Lakeside Learning Field Trips

  Lakeside Learning Field Trips Lakeside Learning is a 2.5 hour inquiry-based field trip program for fourth grade students. Students will experience Great Salt Lake and learn about its ecosystems through informal environmental education strategies, incorporating science, technology, engineering, art, and math (STEAM) to reinforce the Utah Common Core State…

Migratory Birds Community Linking Partnerships

Range-Wide Migratory Bird Conservation Through Linking Partnerships A Hemispheric Perspective "Great Salt Lake is the site of one of the largest shorebird concentrations in the world. If a light were lit where each shorebird began its journey, a map of Alaska, Canada, and the northwestern US would shine as with…

Educator Resources

Discussion Questions Great Salt Lake Study Questions.pdf   Activities and Experiments Biomes and Great Salt Lake.pdf Wetlands.pdf Mystery of the Missing Salt.pdf Salty Investigations.pdf Oolitic Sand.pdf Sink or Float.pdf Shaky Ground.pdf Changing States.pdf

Lake Affect DVD

Living Together Along the Shores of Something Great YOU CAN NOW ORDER THE LAKE AFFECT DVD ONLINE or Order by Mail FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake continues a major regional education project designed to enhance both knowledge about and care for the future of our Great Salt Lake. We are proud…
deco1.png

Why We Care

  • Somewhere there should be a place for artists and tourists—if no one else is interested—to watch the gulls wheel into a flaming sunset and to ripple their hands in the smooth brine.

    George Dibble, "Deserted Site Remains Tourist Artist Mecca," Salt Lake Tribune, 1961